Category Archives: Uncategorized

Creating a local OmniOS repository

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Sometimes it is a good idea or even necessary to have a local mirror of OmniOS available, i.e. if you do not want to allow your severs direct access to the outside world. Setting up a local OmniOS repository is rather simple. 1. Create a local package repo To create an empty repo, run pkgrepo: 2. Grab packages from remote… Read more »

Upgrade OmniOS to r151014

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Just a quick memory hook on how to update an OmniOS release… Update the publisher to point to the new release, r151014 being the release version to update to in this case: To update the client’s list of available packages and publisher metadata, run The actual update process is invoked with If you happen to have use zones, the process… Read more »

Pango-WARNING **: failed to choose a font, expect ugly output.

If you try to start a graphical application on a minimal Fedora or CentOS setup, e.g. via ssh -X, you might face the situation that the program actually starts up, but no font appears (or a weird one, or only squares where the letters are supposed to be). If you start a program that uses Pango, like firefox, you get… Read more »

Sharing a screen session with another user

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GNU screen has builtin multiuser support that let’s you share a screen session with another user. First, create a screen session named with an arbitrary name, e.g. ‘shared’, and attach to it: To allow other users to use the session, you need to enable multiuser support (Ctrl-a :multiuser on) and add the specific user(s) you want to share your session… Read more »

Running PulseAudio as system service

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Running PulseAudio in system mode is usually a bad idea. There are use cases however, where PulseAudio’s system mode is a great tool, e.g. for building a PulseAudio streaming target to stream audio from multiple clients to speakers. First, install PulseAudio, avahi (a free implementation of zeroconf) to publish the service throughout the network and the corresponding PulseAudio module: Since… Read more »

No default route with Fedora’s legacy network service

There’s a bug in Fedora 20 and RHEL 7, where the legacy network service does not set the default route properly. This is due to the fact, that the network service does not evaluate the GATEWAY0 directive in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-ethX that is used by NetworkManager. To set the default route with the legacy network service, simply change GATEWAY0 to GATEWAY: Of… Read more »

Configuring LACP between OpenIndiana and a Dell Force10 switch

Link aggregation is a method of bundling interfaces together to act as one for increased bandwith and/or failover. One of most used protocols, next to a couple of proprietary ones, for controlling such a channel bond is LACP, the Link Aggregation Control Protocol. 1. Configuring LACP on Dell S4810 Let’s assume, we want to bond two 10G Ethernet ports together,… Read more »

Setting up an authenticating proxy server with squid3 and pam_auth

While the squid proxy server has quite a few different flavours of authentication available, one of the most basic ones, pam_auth, is also one of the most useful ones to get you started quickly. pam_auth let’s anyone who has a local account access the squid proxy. In large environments you probably want to use ldap authentication eventually, but pam_auth is… Read more »

Baikal: A lightweight CalDAV/CardDAV server

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Baikal is a lightweight, free and open-source CalDAV and CardDAV server implementation that allows you to synchronize your address book and appointments with multiple clients such as mobile devices or a desktop application like Thunderbird. It lacks a couple of important features for enterprise use cases, such as address book and calendar sharing between multiple users, but it’s very suitable… Read more »

Installing kvm on Fedora 20

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Installing kvm on a recent Fedora OS is quite easy. Fedora already ships all the necessary software packages and kernel modules for running a kernel virtualised machine. 0. Prerequisites Since late 2005 / early 2006 almost every x86 processor is capable of hardware virtualization. To check if your CPU supports Intel’s VT-d or AMD’s Pacifica, which is a requirement for… Read more »